Monday, 5 October 2015

I ate beef cutlet

I ate beef cutlet


        You might be wondering what is so special about this blog. Even I never thought the title of this blog will ever be controversial. Sadly, that is what we all have come to.


        Do you realize, Kerala is one of the few places in India
which doesn’t judge you if you tell the title of this blog out aloud? A couple of reasons. One, we are educated enough to understand that what one eats is his/her personal choice. Whatever my religion is or of that of the person who eats it has nothing to do with that choice. When I say educated, it does not mean the number of people with a degree from a university. By educated, I mean the ability to embrace pluralism – ability to understand another person’s view point.

        Secondly, the social fabric of the state is such that we have all the three larger communities living at peace with each other. Not only at peace, but with much love also. I think one of the reasons is the fact that we all have friends in all the communities. So the thought of a person is good or bad just because he/she is from a particular community does not cross our minds. We celebrate all the festivals without thinking of which book it originates from.

        The good thing is that in Kerala, we are still free to eat what we want. We all love the biriyani from Kozhikode, the beef curry from Kottayam and the sambar from Palakkad. We will continue to love these dishes. Along the way, we will continue loving the people who make them too J.

P.s. Is eating beef cruelty towards animals? Yes. Should we stop it? May be we should start trying. But reason should be that and not anything else. Having said that,  isn't eating chicken and mutton also cruelty? Should we stop that too? I'm an ideal world, we should.

1 comment:

  1. I agree about the secularism part in Kerala. But I've also read somewhere that Hinduism came on as a religion later to Kerala. We were separated by the Western Ghats and hence had a different way of life as compared to the rest of the country. Even when Hinduism came and took over as a religion, there were a few habits which Malayalees found difficult to change, one of them - consumption of beef. While the so called higher castes did avoid it to a large extent, they weren't really rigid about everyone else following all these rules. Recently though, there has been an increase in Hindus of all castes even in Kerala avoiding beef. Perhaps the wave of Hindutva is finally reaching our shores too.

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